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Bolger's Dawn is crowned top two-year-old

JIM Bolger's Dawn Approach maintained the recent dominance of Irish juveniles as he was crowned the champion two-year-old on the European Thoroughbred Rankings.

Unbeaten in six races, including the National Stakes and Dewhurst, the Godolphin-owned son of New Approach received a respectable rating of 124 but was upwards of 6lb ahead of his peers.

Garry O'Gorman, the senior Irish handicapper who is part of the ratings process, said: "Dawn Approach is the seventh Irish-trained champion or joint-champion in the last eight years, which we're obviously pleased about, but it was not a vintage bunch of two-year-olds."

Below Dawn Approach is Aidan O'Brien's Kingsbarns (118), who took the Racing Post Trophy on his second start and is ante-post Investec Derby favourite and just behind Bolger's colt in the betting for the 2000 Guineas.

Richard Hannon's Olympic Glory and the Clive Cox-trained Middle Park winner Reckless Abandon were the highest-rated British juveniles among a bunch on 117.

The World Thoroughbred Rankings for the three-year-old division were unanimous among the handicappers.

I'll Have Another, the American colt, was the highest-rated in the world on 125, ahead of the highest European horse, Camelot, on 124.

O'Brien's colt landed the 2000 Guineas and Derby but failed to complete the English Triple Crown in the St Leger.

Frankel was finally granted the ultimate position in the recent history of Flat racing as the World Thoroughbred Rankings announced him as the highest-rated horse since their system began in 1977 with a mark of 140.

While now widely acknowledged as the greatest of all time, Henry Cecil's colt would not even have beaten the previous marker had Dancing Brave's 141 in 1986 not been reduced to 138.

However, the group of handicappers across Europe who comprise the ranking committee have long voiced their concern that methods have evolved over the last 35 years, and that some horses have ended up with figures which are slightly too high.

These were applied to a statistical method devised by British Horseracing Authority chief handicapper Phil Smith.