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Sunday 22 September 2019

Horan: Dublin debate skewed

No backpass rule to be examined by Croke Park

MORE ANALYSIS: GAA President John Horan during the GAA Football All Ireland Senior Championship Series National Launch at Scotstown GAA Club, Monaghan. Photo: Sportsfile
MORE ANALYSIS: GAA President John Horan during the GAA Football All Ireland Senior Championship Series National Launch at Scotstown GAA Club, Monaghan. Photo: Sportsfile

John Horan says the debate over capital funding for Dublin GAA requires a more detailed investigation to provide a more accurate picture of the distribution of Croke Park finance.

The issue has grown to a crescendo as the Dublin footballers continue their monopoly of both the Leinster and All-Ireland SFC titles and figures for games development grants show a disproportionately high allocation for the capital.

"People are operating off global figures because Dublin's money goes from Croke Park whereas most of the other counties in Leinster get their money from the province by going from Croke Park to the province," said Horan, speaking at the launch of this year's All-Ireland SFC in Scotstown yesterday.

Analysis

"I think there needs to be a greater analysis of it. It's very easy to take a global figure and say it's one point whatever going to Dublin and whatever going to the rest.

"But if you actually did an analysis, how many... where is the penetration in the schools, which a lot of the coaching money in Dublin is going into, and that goes into camogie and ladies' football as well."

Last year, Dublin received a €1.46m allocation from the Games Development Fund, approximately 14% of the overall fund.

By way of relevant comparison, Tyrone, who lost to Dublin in last year's All-Ireland final, received 2% (€119,000).

However, Horan pointed out that while the figures have been presented on a per player basis in some media investigations on the issue, that depiction was inaccurate as the money is largely spent on coaching of children of primary school age.

"I remember having a meeting with (Meath GAA Operations manager) Seamus Kenny and Shane Flanagan (Leinster GAA operations manager).

"And Shane Flanagan's comment at the meeting between the three of us was that per head of population there's actually more coaching money going into Meath than Dublin."

"The funding going into Dublin is to maintain participation levels in the organisation, which is key," he added.

Horan also hinted that a rule prohibiting a back pass to a football goalkeeper could be discussed at special congress to encourage teams to press higher up the pitch.

"Of the 20 games that were analysed for the National League, there was an average of 10 back passes to the goalkeeper," Horan revealed.

"If you think about it, if you take out the goalkeeper as the safety valve behind the defence, it then allows the team to press forward much more and actually draw them out instead of going back behind."

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