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GAA ready to make big call

Meeting to discuss season hangs on virus directive

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The GAA may stop short, however, of announcing a deferral of the championship start on May 9/10 - even if that's a deadline that now looks impossible to meet. Photo: Ray Ryan / Sportsfile

The GAA may stop short, however, of announcing a deferral of the championship start on May 9/10 - even if that's a deadline that now looks impossible to meet. Photo: Ray Ryan / Sportsfile

SPORTSFILE

The GAA may stop short, however, of announcing a deferral of the championship start on May 9/10 - even if that's a deadline that now looks impossible to meet. Photo: Ray Ryan / Sportsfile

The shape of the GAA season is likely to become clearer in the next 24 hours as the Association awaits a fresh direction from the Government on a probable extension on restrictions imposed on gatherings earlier in the month.

The GAA fell into line with the Government's previous directive on March 12, suspending all training, games and activity until March 29.

As the coronavirus pandemic begins to climb to a peak, new measures being considered are expected to push out a further suspension of activity until well into April at the earliest. Many counties have already suspended all activity until the end of April.

The GAA may stop short, however, of announcing a deferral of the championship start on May 9/10 - even if that's a deadline that now looks impossible to meet.

A decision to shelve the leagues and bring certainty to that competition, with the exception of some lower divisional hurling finals that are promotion dependent, could be imminent.

GAA officials had a teleconference call with many of the county board chairmen across the country on Friday last and will convene them again for another briefing in the morning.

One of the issues addressed will be advance payment of league revenues, although reduced because of the loss of the last two rounds and the finals, to help counties deal with any liquidity problems they may be building up because of the absence of revenue streams.

Issues around insurance were also raised but for now, the GAA's public liability continues to provide cover outside games and training.

However, any State ban on access to public parks could see the GAA do similar with its property.