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Cian: I'm up to take a penalty

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Dublin’s Cian O’Sullivan goes green at the launch of Ballygowan’s recyclable rPET 500ml bottle at Parnell Park. Photo: INPHO

Dublin’s Cian O’Sullivan goes green at the launch of Ballygowan’s recyclable rPET 500ml bottle at Parnell Park. Photo: INPHO

©INPHO/Dan Sheridan

Dublin’s Cian O’Sullivan goes green at the launch of Ballygowan’s recyclable rPET 500ml bottle at Parnell Park. Photo: INPHO

The cold-blooded nature of a penalty shoot-out may just be the harshest manner in which to lose a championship match but that hasn't stopped hands going up if the situation arises in the weeks and months ahead.

Galway's Damien Comer, Kerry's David Clifford and Donegal's Ryan McHugh all made it clear at yesterday's SuperValu launch of their sponsorship partnership of the All-Ireland football championship, that they would be willing to put themselves forward.

But even as Ireland's Euro 2020 qualification died on the spot in Bratislava on Thursday night, none were more enthusiastic than Dublin defender Cian O'Sullivan who said he was on standby if Dessie Farrell came calling.

"100 per cent, I'm in, but whether they (management) call or not, there is going to be a big question over that," said O'Sullivan.

O'Sullivan feels teams can't overlook practicing penalties and not have a strategy for them. "You would be a bit naive to think that you don't have to prepare for your penalty kicks," the Dublin defender said.

The spectre of penalties is looming larger as a way to decide championship games - or 'winner on the day' as it is termed. If two 10-minute periods of extra-time can't separate two teams then each will take five penalties before sudden death.

They could be more common than thought at the outset, if the club championships are anything to gauge by.

In Tyrone, Dungannon Clarkes' first championship win in 64 years was decided on penalties against a Trillick side that had advanced to the final courtesy of a shoot-out success.