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Dan White: 10 things Enda must do now

After 36 years in the Dail, Enda Kenny has finally been elected Taoiseach. He inherits a dreadful mess from the previous government. These are the 10 things Enda must do in his first 100 days in office to rescue the country from disaster.

1 Sort out the banking crisis once and for all: The banking system has become a bottomless pit. No matter how much fresh capital the Government pumps in, the banks' losses just keep on increasing.

Unless Enda can quickly find a way to stop throwing good money after bad, his Government is dead on arrival.

2 Force the ECB to share the pain: During the general election we heard plenty of calls to "burn" the bank senior bondholders. Unfortunately, most of the senior bondholders have long since been repaid with the ECB having lent the Irish banks, institutions which it must have known were insolvent, €70bn to repay their senior bondholders in full. With the vast majority of the senior bondholders having flown the coop and the Irish taxpayer unable to bear the full burden of the banks' losses, the ECB must be made to share the pain.

3 Cut the interest rate on the bailout: The 5.8pc interest rate the EU is charging us for the €45bn it is lending us as part of last November's bailout is nothing short of loan sharking -- the EU is paying just 2.9pc to borrow this money. We need to cut this rate, no matter what Angela Merkel thinks.

4 Make all senior civil servants re-apply for their jobs: Last week's whitewash on the role played by the Department of Finance on the events leading up to the banking crisis notwithstanding, it is clear that the civil service has performed lamentably in recent years.

There has already been a clearout of the politicians who got us into this mess. There now needs to be a clearout of the civil servants, with all top bureaucrats forced to re-apply for their jobs.

5 Lay down the law to Labour: Unlike previous coalitions between the two parties, Fine Gael could have gone it alone this time -- there were enough like-minded independents to support a minority government and Fianna Fail is desperate to avoid another general election any time soon.

Kenny must make it clear to Eamon Gilmore that any repeat of Labour's 1980s foot-dragging will result in the party's immediate expulsion from government.

6 Introduce a constitutional amendment to cut judges' pay: With a significant minority of judges still refusing to accept either the public sector pay cuts or pension levy after almost two years, it is clear that the current 'voluntary' arrangement isn't working. Kenny should change the constitution to force the judges to accept the levy and pay cuts and make them share the suffering with the rest of us.

7 Put the 12.5pc tax rate into the constitution: While he's amending the constitution, Enda should also put the 12.5pc company tax rate into the constitution. This would make it clear to the loathsome French president Nicolas Sarkozy (above) and other European leaders that Ireland isn't for turning on the company tax issue.

8 Cull at least 100 quangos: One of the most noxious legacies of the previous government was the proliferation of quangos. There are now over 1,000 of these unelected and unaccountable bodies. Most of them seem to serve no other purpose other than to provide employment for interfering busybodies who then go on to make life a misery for anyone trying to run a business and create jobs.

Enda should set himself a target of closing down at least one quango a day during his first 100 days.

9 Tear up the Croke Park deal and scrap benchmarking: Labour will try to use Brendan Howlin's appointment as public sector 'reform' minister, an oxymoron if ever there was one, to stall much-needed public sector reform and protect excessive bureaucratic salaries.

Enda should make it clear that the Croke Park deal is history and that public sector salaries must reflect the new economic realities.

10 Scrap the HSE: Six years on it is clear that Micheal Martin's creation, the HSE, isn't working.

Instead of getting rid of health service red tape, it has made the problem even worse. The sooner this bureaucratic monster is put out of its misery, the better.