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X-rated viral video nothing to do with us, says Beaumont

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The risque video did not originate in Beaumont Hospital, officials said in a statement. Photo: INM

The risque video did not originate in Beaumont Hospital, officials said in a statement. Photo: INM

The risque video did not originate in Beaumont Hospital, officials said in a statement. Photo: INM

An X-rated video purporting to show two medical staff being intimate did not originate in Dublin's Beaumont Hospital, hospital officials have said.

A spokesperson for the hospital told the Herald it was aware images and video were being circulated online that "purport to show staff from the hospital behaving in an inappropriate manner".

Beaumont said the management wished to "state categorically and emphatically that the individuals depicted are not in any way connected with the organisation, now or at any point in the past".

It is regrettable that this material has been linked with Beaumont Hospital, causing unnecessary concern for patients, families and staff," a spokeswoman added.

The video was circulated on messaging app WhatsApp earlier this week and was accompanied by a text message claiming it was from Beaumont Hospital. Meanwhile the new National Hearing Implant and Research Centre (NHIRC) at Beaumont Hospital was officially opened by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar yesterday.

The state-of-the-art centre will facilitate further research into cochlear implantation and neurotology - neurological disorders of the ear - for children and adults.

Pioneer

The NHIRC has been spearheaded by Professor Laura Viani, a pioneer in the field of cochlear implantation and neurotology.

Prof Viani started the National Cochlear Implant Programme at Beaumont Hospital in 1995.

Since then, the programme has become a full-fledged clinical department at the hospital, carrying out more than 200 cochlear implants every year.

A cochlear implant is a medical device that is inserted into the ear of people with severe to profound hearing loss.

When coupled with an external processor, the device converts sound waves into signals that can be detected by the auditory nerve, allowing the patient to hear speech and sounds and communicate with other people.

"The work undertaken at this new research centre will have a profound impact on the quality of life and outcomes of patients," Mr Varadkar, speaking at the official opening,said.

"It's also a great example of the world-class health research being undertaken in Ireland.

"I'd like to pay special tribute to the pioneering work of Prof Viani, who has revolutionised how we treat severe hearing loss and ear disorders in Ireland.

"Through her work, thousands of lives will be transformed."