| 10.9°C Dublin

'This could have been fatal' - grim warning after digger smashes into city street bridge

Close

A digger comes off the back of the truck it was travelling on after crashing into the bridge on Amiens Street yesterday

A digger comes off the back of the truck it was travelling on after crashing into the bridge on Amiens Street yesterday

A digger comes off the back of the truck it was travelling on after crashing into the bridge on Amiens Street yesterday

A digger smashing into a Dublin city bridge could have led to people being killed yesterday, Irish Rail has warned.

There were serious delays following the Amiens Street collision which happened at about 1.20pm.

Dramatic CCTV footage of the incident shows a lorry carrying the digger, which smashed into the bridge at Connolly Station as the truck tried to pass beneath.

Rail services between Connolly and Tara Street were suspended as a result but later resumed.

Irish Rail shared dramatic CCTV footage of the crash as it urged drivers to be aware of their load height.

There was also a warning that the crash could have been fatal.

"Had pedestrians, cyclists or motorists been on the other side of the road, people could have been killed at Amiens Street at lunchtime," Irish Rail said in a statement.

"Know your load height for the safety of all."

A garda spokeswoman told the Herald that there had been no structural damage to the railway bridge following the incident.

Last month, a similar incident happened at the same site, where an articulated lorry became wedged under the bridge.

Campaign

Irish Rail figures confirmed that there were 95 bridge strikes in 2018, compared with 85 the previous year.

One bridge, between Portmarnock and Malahide, was the country's worst for collisions last year, with seven incidents reported.

Dublin City councillor Janice Boylan is now calling for an awareness campaign into the height restrictions of bridges across the capital.

"This latest incident could have been fatal," she said.

"There was a poor man on the footpath.

"Only by the grace of God he wasn't in the way when the digger fell.

"People who drive trucks for a living really need to be aware of their surroundings.

"I believe the council need to create an awareness campaign and erect far more signposts in the proximity of these bridges."

Ms Boylan added that she does not think increasing the height of Irish Rail's bridges is the right thing to do.

"A lot of these bridges are more than 100 years old, and they have an important historic significance in our city," she said.

"I don't think it is necessary to increase their heights."

The Irish Rail network comprises around 400 bridges which cross public roads.

The company works closely with the Irish Road Haulage Association and local authorities to educate and inform drivers of the dangers.