herald

Tuesday 21 August 2018

Parents take to streets after boy (6) hit by car

Children from Booterstown National School and their parents protest about the traffic situation on Cross Avenue in Blackrock, Dublin. Photo: Caroline Quinn
Children from Booterstown National School and their parents protest about the traffic situation on Cross Avenue in Blackrock, Dublin. Photo: Caroline Quinn

PARENTS at a Dublin school where a six-year-old boy was left seriously injured after being knocked down on the street outside are demanding traffic calming measures be put in place.

The boy is in a serious condition in hospital after the incident on Thursday when he was struck by a car when he left Booterstown National School.

Paramedics attended the scene and he was taken by ambulance to Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, for treatment before being moved to Temple Street Children's Hospital.

Action

Outraged parents yesterday took to the streets to call for traffic calming measures to be introduced outside the school, saying that they have been calling on the local council to take action "for years".

The boy's grandmother, Patricia Butler, told the Herald that he is in intensive care and that the family are hoping he will be ok.

"You have to wait until a child is hit, lying in intensive care before they do anything," said Patricia.

"It is traumatic for parents to see this and my daughter saw it. She saw her child being hit," she added.

Chairperson of the school's Board of Management Reverend Gillian Wharton said that they have been highlighting the danger passing traffic poses to pupils to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council for years, but that little progress has being made.

"Sadly what happened was an accident and it wasn't the fault of anybody," said Reverend Wharton.

"The person was driving at an appropriate speed but unfortunately accidents happen and measures have to be taken to help people recognise that there are a lot of children around," she added.

The council previously carried out a review of the issue but decided that additional traffic calming measures were unnecessary.

Investigation

It declined to comment last night as they were "awaiting the conclusion of a garda investigation".

Local councillor and former Minister for Education Mary Hanafin said that she was very aware of the issue having taught at a nearby school for 17 years.

"I know the exact impact of children running out on to this road and there will be extra children here soon because another school is moving up here. That is a special school for children with special needs so there is immediacy now," said Ms Hanafin.

Fine Gael TD Mary Mitchell-O'Connor said: "As a former school principal, I can say that these accidents can happen every morning and every evening outside any school."

hnews@herald.ie

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