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Mystery skeleton in riverbank is revealed to be 600 years old

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The skeletal remains in the riverbank at River Valley Park, Swords, Dublin

The skeletal remains in the riverbank at River Valley Park, Swords, Dublin

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

The skeletal remains in the riverbank at River Valley Park, Swords, Dublin

Archaeologists are investigating and protecting human remains found in the banks of a Dublin river.

The skeletal remains were discovered by walkers in Swords on Monday and gardai were called to the scene.

However, after calling in a forensic anthropologist it was later confirmed the bones were from the 15th century.

They were found at River Valley Park at around 6.30pm when a section of the River Ward washed away part of the bank.

The site is close to an old burial ground, and the river has previously thrown up other finds of historical significance.

In 1999, six medieval female skeletons were unearthed in its banks after a skull was seen buried in the mud.

When further excavations took place, an Edward I silver coin from the 13th century was discovered.

After the most recent find officers sealed off the area while examinations took place.

"The skeletal remains were examined by a forensic anthropologist and deemed to be ancient, dating back to roughly the 15th century," a garda statement said.

"This is no longer a garda matter and the scene has been lifted. The National Museum of Ireland (NMI) will be notified of the find."

Inspected

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Daniel (4) and Brandon Martin (7), from Swords, view the skeletal remains

Daniel (4) and Brandon Martin (7), from Swords, view the skeletal remains

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Daniel (4) and Brandon Martin (7), from Swords, view the skeletal remains

The NMI said its archaeologists and those from Fingal County Council inspected the site and were working closely with the National Monuments Service and gardai to protect it.

"The site, where archaeological remains were previously found a number of years ago, has now been cordoned off to protect it until such time as further investigation can safely take place," it said in a statement.

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A forensic archaeologist examines the remains

A forensic archaeologist examines the remains

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

A forensic archaeologist examines the remains