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I smashed up Kildare hotel room to cook crack - snooker legend Jimmy

Snooker star Jimmy White has revealed how his addiction to crack cocaine once led to him breaking up a bedroom in the Keadeen Hotel in Kildare to get wood to 'cook up' the drug.

So desperate was White (52) for a hit that he and fellow player Kirk Stevens took apart the furniture in their room to start a fire in the family-run four-star hotel in Newbridge.

Whirlwind White, who made it to six world championship finals but never lifted the title, recalls the sad and destructive episode of his life in his autobiography Second Wind.

spree

He tells how he went on a three-month crack spree after losing to Steve Davis at Sheffield's Crucible in 1984.

At one point he was spending €13,000 a month on drugs.

"We had to score some crack. We got our hands on some from somewhere. I might have even flown it in , I can't remember," wrote the father-of-five.

"Kirk Stevens was a big cocaine taker on the snooker circuit. The pair of us were holed up in the Keadeen Hotel in Co Kildare."

He told how Stevens sent him down to the bar to get all the lighters he could and they tried to cook the rocks of crack.

"I started trying to dismantle the door of the wardrobe so we could use it as firewood.

"We started breaking down the furniture in the room, a table here, a wardrobe there, trying to get a fire started so we could cook this stuff up," he wrote.

In the book, serialised by The Sun newspaper, White said: "That's how sadistic the drug is. That's how crazy it had sent us."

"Two of the best snooker players in the world, holed away in an Irish hotel room, smashing up chairs and ripping up a duvet so we could make an indoor fire and smoke some crack," he added.

Management at the hotel, run by the O'Loughlin family, were today unable to recall the incident from 30 years ago.

"I would have only been a child at the time, and all I remember is that the snooker players that stayed with us were always very nice, and would chat to people and sign autographs," said director Anna O'Loughlin.

"They used to practice on the hotel pool table," she added.

cfeehan@herald.ie


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