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Hero twins help launch 'Angels' campaign

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Keith Duffy with former conjoined twins Hassan and Hussein Benhaffaf who both receive services from the Irish Wheelchair Association on a weekly basis at the launch of Irish Wheelchair Association's  annual 'Angels' fundraising campaign at The Bord Gais Theatre,Dublin

Keith Duffy with former conjoined twins Hassan and Hussein Benhaffaf who both receive services from the Irish Wheelchair Association on a weekly basis at the launch of Irish Wheelchair Association's annual 'Angels' fundraising campaign at The Bord Gais Theatre,Dublin

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Keith Duffy with former conjoined twins Hassan and Hussein Benhaffaf who both receive services from the Irish Wheelchair Association on a weekly basis at the launch of Irish Wheelchair Association's annual 'Angels' fundraising campaign at The Bord Gais Theatre,Dublin

The brave mother of formerly conjoined twins Hassan and Hussein Benhaffaf has spoken about how the Irish Wheelchair Association (IWA) has helped her two boys go to pre-school like their sisters.

Angie Benhaffaf was speaking at the launch of the IWA's 'Angels' campaign that her two little boys helped to promote alongside Boyzone's Keith Duffy.

She said the importance of the support the family receives from the IWA was "huge".

The special needs assistants provided by the association mean the boys can attend pre-school with a helping hand while still retaining their own independence.

The two heroes were kitted out in matching Superman outfits to launch the organisation's annual fundraising campaign.

Mischievous

And the "two happy, mischievous boys" as their mother describes them made an impression on the Coronation Street star.

"They'd blow you away these two guys," Keith said. They've only got one leg and you can't catch them - they fly around the floor, they're just brilliant."

But behind the smiles the family faces ongoing challenges, with regular hospital visits a part of their daily lives.

"Nobody sees the pain and hard work of the day-to-day," Angie said.

Hassan, who has "half a pelvis and a half a chest" requires special surgery on his spine for severe congenital scoliosis every six months and will continue to receive surgery until he is 16.

"You think that, because you hand your child over so much for surgery that it will get easier ... but every time for me is like the first time," she said.

"Emotionally it does take its toll but...we somehow manage to keep it all afloat."

hnews@herald.ie


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