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Grieving husband finally gets to see Savita report

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Praveen Halappanavar arrives at Galway Coroners Court for the inquest into the death of his wife Savita Halappanavar. Photo: PA

Praveen Halappanavar arrives at Galway Coroners Court for the inquest into the death of his wife Savita Halappanavar. Photo: PA

Praveen Halappanavar arrives at Galway Coroners Court for the inquest into the death of his wife Savita Halappanavar. Photo: PA

THE long-awaited HSE report into the death of Savita Halappanavar contains a number of "significant" recommendations which her husband will want to see implemented, according to his solicitor.

Praveen Halappanavar finally received copy of the final draft report yesterday evening.

It was handed to him by his solicitor Gerard O'Donnell.

The widower took some time to read extracts of the document with Mr O'Donnell before opting to review the rest privately.

"I gave him a copy of the report and we went through some of it. It was very upsetting for him. He just wanted to go off and absorb it quietly and review it a few times by himself. It's not an easy read," said Mr O'Donnell.

Praveen will also liaise with Savita's family in India, taking into account their wishes before making any comment.

 

Daughter

Mr O'Donnell said the report contained a number of "significant" recommendations which his client would like to see implemented immediately.

"There are a number of critical and key recommendations which are very interesting.

"They are what we would have expected as an absolute minimum. But a recommendation is no guarantee of implementation. We would hope that these would be put into practice as proper guidelines," added Mr O'Donnell.

None of the staff who participated in the clinical review are named in the report, which contains a number of legal references to the Constitution. It also addresses whether there was ever any chance to save the couple's unborn daughter Prasa and also looks in detail at all medical evidence, including whether tests for blood infection were followed up in time.

Other areas focused on include whether medical management of the case was in line with best practice, and whether doctors should have suggested a termination at an earlier stage.

The report also looks at whether the absence of legislation in the area of termination was a factor.

Mr O'Donnell confirmed they had secured a medical expert to review the HSE report into Ms Halappanavar's death.

The team will now take the weekend to review all aspects of the report before deciding early next week whether they wish to comment.

Along with that, they must decide whether they wish to accept an invitation to meet with the chairman of the clinical review team, Dr Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, next week.

 

Suffering

"There have been no time constraints put on us at all and clearly the report comprises of some 108 pages I've no doubt it's a detailed and complex report and will require to be considered by my client, myself and indeed our experts," said Mr O'Donnell.

The solicitor received the 108-page HSE report from Tony Canavan, chief operating officer of the Galway Roscommon Hospital Group yesterday morning.

Mr O'Donnell added that this was the first time either himself or his client had seen sight of the report and they would consider it with "a fresh mind".

Savita was 17 weeks pregnant when she went to the Galway University Hospital on October 21 suffering from a miscarriage. Her husband has maintained that they repeatedly requested a termination but this was refused because a foetal heartbeat was still present.

She died from septicaemia on October 28.

Mr Canavan said he hoped Mr Halappanavar would provide some input into the final report adding that it was open for him to do so.

ccrawford@herald.ie


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