| 13.2°C Dublin

Dubliners can't travel abroad but tourists can visit any other counties

Close

People can arrive here from abroad and visit other counties
but people living in Dublin have been told they can't travel

People can arrive here from abroad and visit other counties but people living in Dublin have been told they can't travel

People can arrive here from abroad and visit other counties but people living in Dublin have been told they can't travel

People in Dublin are being told not to leave the county for either domestic or overseas travel for the next three weeks under Level 3 restrictions.

This means people living in Dublin should not fly out of Dublin Airport to destinations on the revised Green List unless it's for essential reasons.

However, people can not be legally punished under the new rules and gardaí can only urge them to follow the restrictions.

The restrictions on leaving the county will apply for all travel, domestic and foreign, the Cabinet decided.

However, tourists arriving in Dublin Airport will be free to travel to other counties while the capital is in lockdown.

The same restrictions will be applied to Dublin as were introduced in Kildare, Laois and Offaly, where people were allowed travel through the county but asked only to stop if it was for an essential reason.

Similarly, air travellers arriving in Dublin for holidays will still be able to travel by train, bus and car to another county if that is where they are staying.

People will only be allowed to travel in and out of Dublin for essential work, education and/or care needs, the Government will advise.

However, a Government spokesperson confirmed the international travel restrictions will only be enforced by gardaí through "policing by consent".

Enforce

"In supporting the Covid-19 public health guidelines and regulations, An Garda Síochána has and will continue to adopt, a graduated policing response based on its tradition of policing by consent," the said.

"This has seen Garda members engage, educate, encourage and, as a last resort, enforce.

"In respect of travel regulations, which are not declared to be Penal Regulations under the Health Act 1947 as amended, under Operation Fanacht, An Garda Síochána will continue to use the approach of the three Es which will see gardaí engage, educate and encourage, only, compliance with travel regulations," he added.

On Thursday, the Department of Foreign Affairs updated the Green List to include countries with a 14-day disease incidence rate of 25 or less per 100,000, based on data provided by the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC).

The move means from Monday, people arriving in Dublin from Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland can fly into Ireland without being asked to restrict their movements for two weeks.

People can also fly from Ireland to these countries without being asked to restrict their movements on their return.

Meanwhile, Estonia, Greece, Greenland, Hungary, Italy, Norway and Slovakia are to be removed from the Green List as of Monday.

Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney said the Government agreed to "broadly support" the European Commission's air travel plan.