herald

Sunday 10 December 2017

DSPCA foster out 32 rescued puppies

Some of the 116 puppies in the care of the DSPCA. The puppies believed to be between five to eight weeks of age - were discovered in the back of two vans boarding a ferry at Dublin Port for the UK and now in the care by the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (DSPCA). 5/2/2015
Some of the 116 puppies in the care of the DSPCA. The puppies believed to be between five to eight weeks of age - were discovered in the back of two vans boarding a ferry at Dublin Port for the UK and now in the care by the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (DSPCA). 5/2/2015

A total of 88 of the puppies rescued from a swoop in Dublin Port are receiving round the clock care at an animal shelter.

The puppies seized by DSPCA inspectors when they were found crammed into two vans at Dublin Port continue to receive care by the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (DSPCA).

The puppies are coming on well and contacts from the public about adopting the animals continue to grow. Some 3,500 messages have now been received about the puppies.

"Thirty-two of the puppies have been given to foster carers while we have 88 puppies," said Gillian Bird, spokeswoman for the DSPCA.

"They are being looked after by a full-time staff member and four or five volunteers."

Inspectors are preparing charges in the matter which is expected to be heard in Dublin District Court in the near future.

They were seized because officials believed there was a lack of water and food for the animals for their journey to Britain.

There was no paperwork or "puppy passports".

These breaches of the new animal welfare laws prompted the seizure, said Ms Bird.

"A judge will decide the matter when the evidence is heard," she said.

This was the first case of its type under the new Animal Health and Welfare Act 2013.

The DSPCA is authorised to pursue prosecutions in such matters.

No charges have yet been made against any individuals, but cautions have been issued.

Sources said it was "probable" that some of the animals would have died en route to Britain because they were crammed so close together.

Swans

Meanwhile, a further 12 swans who are suffering from the effects of an oil spill have also added greatly to the workload of staff and volunteers tending to a large variety of animals at the charity.

"The swans will need care for another two to three weeks," said Ms Bird.

The oil spill, which originated in the south west of the city, reached Sean Walsh Park in Tallaght as well two other locations.

South Dublin County Council officials are seeking to discover the source of the oil.

Ms Bird said the natural oils in the swans feathers had gone, which could cause them to get very cold or even sink in water.

It would take two or three weeks before their feathers had recovered sufficiently to allow them back into the wild.

"They are being fed with grains and rice," Ms Bird said.

"The public should not feed swans in the wild with white bread but very coarse brown bread might be adequate," she added.

aokeeffe@herald.ie

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