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'Dad used the Herald to measure up Philo'

  • Jeremiah (94) buying paper since age of 7... and used it to measure Philo’s shirts

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Jeremiah English, who turns 95 on Saturday, pictured with his beloved wife Pauline who passed away 13 years ago

Jeremiah English, who turns 95 on Saturday, pictured with his beloved wife Pauline who passed away 13 years ago

Jeremiah English, who turns 95 on Saturday, pictured with his beloved wife Pauline who passed away 13 years ago

A 94-year-old grandad could be one of the Herald's longest customers - reading the paper every day for 88 years - and Jeremiah English even used our pages as a pattern to stitch Phil Lynott's shirts.

Paula English (64), originally from Crumlin, said her dad Jeremiah, who turns 95 this Saturday, has been buying the Herald since the age of seven as his father sent him to the shop for a copy every day.

Even now as he enjoys his days in a nursing home in Co Kilkenny, Jeremiah still makes sure he gets his copy of the Herald every single day.

Pattern

Back in the late 1960s the shirt-maker was employed by famous Dubliner Phil Lynott, who was just on the cusp of world stardom as the lead singer of Thin Lizzy.

Again it was the Herald which featured prominently, with Jeremiah using the newspaper to cut the patterns for Lynott's shirts.

"Dad made shirts to fit Phil because he had long arms," Paula told the Herald.

"Dad did his shirts because he knew my dad worked making shirts and he asked, 'Would your dad make me a shirt that would fit me?'

"I asked daddy and he said, 'Yes, I'll have to measure him to make a pattern'.

"Daddy measured Phil and made the pattern out of the newspaper.

"I was great friends with Phil. I had an original album he gave me of Black Rose.

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Jeremiah as a child

Jeremiah as a child

Jeremiah as a child

"We lived on the road at the back of Phil in Crumlin. His grandmother and my grandmother were great friends.

"Phil was gorgeous, his sense of dress was amazing. I remember on a Saturday he always went into Grafton Street and he'd always buy yellow tulips to bring home to his granny.

"I'd meet him and he'd pay my bus fare. All the girls would be looking at him and smiling and he'd smile and blow them a kiss.

"He wore my dad's shirts until I guess he was so famous that he moved on from Crumlin and he was able to buy shirts in London and America.

"There was no arrogance to Phil; he was a lovely man. I'm so proud of the man my daddy is and he never stopped buying the Herald all those years.

"I think he's got to be the paper's longest, most loyal customer.

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Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy. Photo: Fin Costello/Redferns

Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy. Photo: Fin Costello/Redferns

Redferns

Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy. Photo: Fin Costello/Redferns

"He used to get the Herald when he was just seven years old and fold it up and leave it on the table for my grandad.

"No one was allowed to open it until granda read the paper. Then my dad grew up and he still bought the Herald every day and even when he moved to Kilkenny for work.

"He went into every shop to find the paper and eventually one agreed to keep it for him every day. He loves reading the Herald."