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Man (32) died an hour after being seen by clinic doctor

A DUBLIN man collapsed and died from a heart attack less than an hour after being sent home by a doctor.

A twin brother of the man, Damien Geraghty, has told a Medical Council fitness to practise inquiry that his 32-year-old twin Anthony said "Ma, I'm dizzy", before falling in to his brother's arms.

It happened in their family home in Ballymun, Dublin, in the early hours of the morning of October 20, 2009.

Shortly before he died, Anthony Geraghty had attended the North-Doc out-of-hours clinic in Coolock, where he was seen by Dr Sandor Endredi.

Dr Endredi, who is originally from Hungary but currently has a practice in Dublin 2, faces seven allegations of poor professional performance in relation to his treatment of Mr Geraghty.

The inquiry has heard that Mr Geraghty had a history of heart disease, was on 'maintenance methadone' for a number of years, and had a history of drinking and taking benzodiazepine-type medication.

Dr Endredi diagnosed him with an upper airway infection, obesity, tachycardia (abnormally fast heart rate), hypertension and alcohol withdrawal.

Breathing

Among the allegations against Dr Endredi are that he failed to take an adequate history from Mr Geraghty; that his diagnosis of an upper airway infection, and drug and alcohol withdrawal syndrome were inconsistent with his clinical findings; and that he failed to give adequate consideration to Mr Geraghty's cardiovascular history.

Dr Endredi is contesting the allegations against him.

Damien Geraghty told the inquiry that on the evening of his brother's death, Anthony's face was grey and that he was having difficulty breathing.

Damien immediately made an appointment to visit the out-of-hours clinic in Coolock. He told the inquiry that Anthony's consultation lasted a maximum of 15 minutes and when he came out he told him he had been given an injection and a beta-blocker, a type of heart medication.

Dr Endredi is due to give his evidence today.

hnews@herald.ie


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