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Drunk struggled with gardai who took bag of booze

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Derek Whelan ‘realised alcohol was a problem’, court heard

Derek Whelan ‘realised alcohol was a problem’, court heard

Derek Whelan ‘realised alcohol was a problem’, court heard

A reveller who resisted gardai when they confiscated his bag of drinks realised "alcohol was a problem" when he woke up with a charge sheet in his hand, a court has heard.

Derek Whelan (32) used a wall to hold himself up as he told officers he had drunk two bottles of wine and two cans before hurling abuse at them.

Judge Michael Walsh adjourned the case for the accused to complete an alcohol awareness programme.

Whelan, a part-time clerical administrator from Palmerstown Court, Palmerstown, pleaded guilty to public order offences following the city centre incident.

He admitted public drunkenness, threatening, abusive and insulting behaviour and resisting gardai.

Dublin District Court heard gardai were on foot patrol at 6pm last February 14 when they came across Whelan leaning against a wall and sleeping at Anglesea Street.

When they spoke to him, he smelled strongly of alcohol, his speech was slurred, he was unsteady on his feet and was using the wall to support himself.

Shouted

He told gardai he had drunk two bottles of wine and two cans of alcohol, and he had more cans in a bag.

When gardai said they would confiscate the bag, Whelan became aggressive and abusive towards them and shouted at them, the court heard.

He resisted gardai in an aggressive manner, would not desist and was arrested.

The accused could not recall the incident, and when he came to his senses it was a "wake-up call" for him, defence solicitor Stephen O'Mahony said.

Whelan had struggled on arrest and had been very intoxicated, to the point that he was "literally using the wall to keep himself on his feet", Mr O'Mahony said.

This was "a normal day's drinking", but his client "simply over-indulged".

He realised alcohol was a problem when he "woke up with the charge sheet in his hand".

After reaching that level of intoxication, he now knew there were "issues" that he had to be mindful of, Mr O'Mahony said, adding that Whelan was very apologetic.