herald

Sunday 18 November 2018

Councillors vote to reduce height of Clontarf sea wall

Part of the flood protection sea wall at Clontarf is to be lowered
Part of the flood protection sea wall at Clontarf is to be lowered

Dublin City councillors have voted in favour of reducing the height of the Clontarf sea wall despite the opposition of the city manager.

Councillors voted in favour of reducing the height of the flood defence by a vote of 34-21 at a full monthly meeting at City Hall last night.

The decision means that part of the sea wall, which is located along James Larkin Road, will be reduced in height.

As a result, it will also not meet national flood protection standards.

The decision means that part of the 625m-long sea wall will be made 30cm lower. The reduction will see the height of the wall come down from 4.25cm to 3.95cm.

It is understood the height of the wall may have to be revisited in the future and might have to be increased again due to climate change and higher tides.

Cost

Local councillor Damian O'Farrell had been campaigning for the reduction, along with a number of residents who claimed that the initial height would affect views of Bull Island and St Anne's Park.

Mr O'Farrell told the Herald last night that the extra cost will only be €60,000 - significantly less expensive than what had been initially believed.

The council had estimated the work would cost in the region of €230,000.

Mr O'Farrell said that the council was to recommend a reduction on the wall previously but had reneged on that promise.

Mr O'Farrell said the main reason to push for reduction in the height of the wall was the views being blocked along that particular stretch.

"The main reason is that the wall is situated in a buffer zone of two areas of natural beauty, the Bull Island biosphere and St Anne's Park," he said.

He added that it would be compliant with Dublin's own development plan, despite not meeting the national flood prevention standards.

He said any flood water from excess rain would not reach any houses in the area and would instead go to the park.

"Any excess water will fall into St Anne's Park," he said. "There is no housing in this area."

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