herald

Wednesday 19 September 2018

Brother accused of murder accepts he 'chopped' victim as trial comes to close

Paul Bradley (54) and his sons have all denied murder
Paul Bradley (54) and his sons have all denied murder
Dean Bradley (24) is charged, along with his father and two brothers, of the murder of Neil Reilly.
Jason Bradley (20), along with his father and two brothers, of the murder of Neil Reilly.
Ryan Bradley (18 is charged, along with his father and two brothers, of the murder of Neil Reilly in January 2017.

A Dublin man on trial for murder with his father and two brothers has admitted he inflicted chop wounds to the deceased's head, body and arms.

Deputy State pathologist Dr Michael Curtis has previously told the trial that the injuries caused lacerations to the man's brain and severe injuries to the back, shoulder and arms.

Paul Bradley (54) and his sons Jason (20), Dean (24) and Ryan (18), of Liscarne Gardens, Dublin 22, have all pleaded not guilty to the murder of Neil Reilly (36) at Esker Glebe, Lucan, on January 18, 2017.

They are on trial at the Central Criminal Court.

Michael Bowman, for Jason Bradley, said his client accepts he was responsible for the chop injuries sustained by the deceased.

Dean Bradley previously admitted to driving a car that struck and drove over the deceased, while Paul Bradley has admitted kicking Mr Reilly.

Sympathy

Paul Murray, for the prosecution, began his closing speech to the jury yesterday, telling them to apply their experience of life to the evidence they have heard and to reach their verdict without sympathy for the deceased or the accused.

Murder victim Neil Reilly was run over, kicked and cut by assailants on January 18 last year
Murder victim Neil Reilly was run over, kicked and cut by assailants on January 18 last year

To be guilty of murder, he said, the accused men must have intended to kill or cause serious injury to Neil Reilly.

He said they have heard evidence that Mr Reilly fired two shots at the Bradley home before escaping in a white van and then transferring to a Mazda driven by another man.

He was chased by the Bradleys, who caught up with him at Esker Glebe, where he suffered fatal injuries.

Motive is not required to prove guilt, but counsel said in this case the motive is clear.

He pointed out that Jason Bradley owed the deceased money for drugs and that Mr Reilly had broken into the Bradley home some weeks earlier. On another occasion, Mr Reilly called at Jason Bradley's workplace.

Mr Murray said these things should be deplored and condemned, but he added: "We do not live in a society where you are entitled to take the law into your own hands."

Counsel told the jury the correct thing to do is to call the gardai. The alternative, where people seek revenge, is lawlessness, he said, adding: "That is something we simply cannot allow or tolerate."

He said the prosecution case is that the men were involved in an agreement to murder Mr Reilly and this can be inferred from their behaviour.

The agreement can be tacit and does not need to be negotiated or written down, but can be reached just beforehand or during the commission of a crime.

Mr Murray told the jury that they can presume that the accused men intended the "natural and probable consequences of their actions".

Shooting

He then asked them: "What are the natural and probable consequences of driving over somebody a number of times, chopping them with a sharp implement a number of times and at various times in between attacking the individual?"

Each of the four accused, he said, lied to gardai when questioned soon after the events of that night.

Each of them was "singing off the same hymn book", telling gardai they drove around following the shooting but couldn't find the person responsible and so returned home.

None of them, he said, admitted going to Esker Glebe or explained what happened there.

While he said the jurors may have sympathy for the Bradleys, he reminded them that Mr Reilly is also a father and a son, and sympathy for either family is to be put aside.

Mr Murray will continue his speech to the jury of five men and six women today. Justice Paul Coffey is presiding.

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