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Apartments plan for Glasnevin printworks rejected a fourth time

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Scanron wanted to build 240 apartments beside the former Smurfit printworks

Scanron wanted to build 240 apartments beside the former Smurfit printworks

Scanron wanted to build 240 apartments beside the former Smurfit printworks

Developers of the former Smurfit printworks in Glasnevin have failed again to secure planning permission for an apartment complex.

An Bord Pleanála rejected an application by Scanron, a company headed by developer, Kieran Gannon, to build 240 apartments on the site of the former factory on Botanic Road under the fast-track planning scheme for strategic housing developments.

It is the fourth attempt by the developers to build apartments on the site, which began with the rejection of plans for 74 houses and 63 apartments in 2014.

In 2016, An Bord Pleanála granted Scanron planning permission for a development of 43 houses and 88 apartments.

However, only 35 houses, which came with price tags of up to €1.25m, were completed when an application to build 299 apartments was made and subsequently refused last year.

The latest plans proposed five apartment blocks ranging from five to seven storeys as well as a cafe, creche, medical centre, swimming pool, cinema, gym and flexi space.

Protected

However, the board said the proposed development did not provide the "optimal design solution" given its location close to architecturally sensitive areas including De Courcy Square and the Botanic Gardens, as well as protected structures at the former Players factory site.

It said the plans would be contrary to the Government's urban development and building height guidelines.

The board said the developer had also not demonstrated that the development would successfully integrate into or enhance the character and public realm of the area.

It claimed inadequate information had been provided in relation to the daylight and sunlight impact of the proposed development on neighbouring properties, while there had been inconsistencies in an environmental report provided by the developer.

An inspector with An Bord Pleanála said amendments made by the developer to the previous plans that had been refused were "insufficient" and "unsuccessful".


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