herald

Monday 11 December 2017

Guinness gets crafty with its new brew

Pictured are Guinness brewers Fedora Heavey (left) Peter Simpson and Luis Ortega announcing the release of Hop House 13, a double-hopped lager made from Irish barley and aromatic hops, which is the latest beer from The Brewers Project at St. James’s Gate.  Hop House 13 Lager is available exclusively on draught from today in selected pubs across the island of Ireland
Pictured are Guinness brewers Fedora Heavey (left) Peter Simpson and Luis Ortega announcing the release of Hop House 13, a double-hopped lager made from Irish barley and aromatic hops, which is the latest beer from The Brewers Project at St. James’s Gate.  Hop House 13 Lager is available exclusively on draught from today in selected pubs across the island of Ireland

Guinness has stepped out of the shadows with a new brew in reaction to the craft beer revolution.

The brewing giant has entered the fray with Hop House 13 lager, the latest product from its Brewer's Project experiment started last September to explore the new tastes.

While the James's Gate giant previously failed to hit the mark with the infamous Guinness Light back in the late 1970s, the master brewers are more confident that Hop House 13 will have more staying power.

"What we are hoping to celebrate the revolution in beer and taste that is happening now," Guinness head of innovation Nick Curtis Davis told the Herald.

"There was a time you would go out for a pint and talk about football, but now people are going out for a few beers and talking about beer.

"With our Brewer's Project beers we are hoping to democratise that experience, and give people more taste and character while at the same time offering the quality people expect with the Guinness name and experience," he added.

The beer is named after an early 1900s hop store building at St James's Gate where hops are still stored.

It will firstly be available on draft in selected pubs before becoming available nationwide in the coming months.

Nick Curtis Davis said he doesn't see the likes of O'Hara's, Galway Bay Brewery, Wicklow Wolf and Galway Hooker as a threat to the Guinness brands.

"There is a new vibrancy to beer, and people appreciate the different tastes and that we all try new things. It is good news for everybody," he said.

cfeehan@herald.ie

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