herald

Thursday 14 December 2017

In space no one can hear you scream at the plot

sci-fi

i'm not sure if it's a good thing or a bad thing, but I spent days after watching Interstellar discussing the movie with others who'd seen it. Mostly the talk came down to the plot holes - and this latest movie by Christopher 'Batman' Nolan has plenty.

It opens in the near future, where much of the planet has turned to dust and farmers are the new heroes as they struggle to feed the masses.

One farmer in the dust bowl is Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), raising his two children Tom and Murphy (Timothée Chalamet and Mackenzie Foy). But things turn weird when Murphy believes her room is haunted. But it's not a ghost, it's a force (from the future) directing the family to a facility used by Nasa, now a shadow of its former self.

There Professor Brand (Michael Caine) is sending the latest mission to explore the far reaches of space to find a new - and nicer - home to save humanity. Luckily, Cooper just happens to be a former astronaut, and before you can count down from 10 he's on the mission. This is one of the few touching moments as Cooper has to walk away from his children, particularly a heartbroken Murphy.

Now for the big special effects as Nolan goes all 2001 as he launches Cooper, Professor Brand's daughter (Anne Hathaway) and two other scientists, played by Wes Bentley and David Gyasi, into the unknown. It looks great (even if one rotating spaceship scene looked like a cut-and-paste, as it's used again later in the movie), and there are some nice twists based on relativity and how we grow older at different rates in space and on planets.

But the last part of the film - which is about time travel - defies all logic as Cooper is given the chance to make the past right. And doesn't.

And when he's finally reunited with his daughter - who's now older than him - the meeting is a jaw-dropping non-event (just see it: it's bizarre). Wonderful in many ways, flawed in others, but Interstellar is still unmissable.

DVD extras: Excellent. Go Blu-Ray and get all the usual digital copy stuff, but plenty of other bonus material.

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