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After the disaster (in more ways than one) of the 1998 reboot, Godzilla is back - but is he any good?

After the disaster (in more ways than one) of the 1998 reboot, Godzilla is back - but is he any good?

Well, yes and no. This time around, they've got the human interest, but the fight scenes (as with Pacific Rim) are way too dark, and even worse, they are few and far between. Here, there's a back story that the atomic bomb tests in the Pacific had a secret motive - to wipe out massive dinosaurs that feed on radiation.

Years later, two chrysalises are found by scientists Ken Watanabe and Sally Hawkins - but one is missing.

That's not good if you work in a nuclear power station, as Joe Brody (Bryan Cranston) does. Detecting quake-like activity, he sends his wife Sandra (Juliette Binoche) underground to investigate. Not a good call, as there's a meltdown, she dies and he's forced to flee with son Ford.

Fifteen years on and, as luck would have it (later in the movie that is), Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) is an army expert in all things bombs. Dad is seen as a nut - but, you'll never guess, he's about to be proved right.

Soon two bad dinosaurs are wreaking havoc on Honolulu and Las Vegas, and threaten the world with their nest of dino eggs. No one can stop them - excelpt Godzilla, who, though a bad actor, is on mankind's side, somehow.

Cue lots of action (Golden Gate Bridge, Las Vegas Strip), but the best character is killed off half-way through the movie and the rest are at best bland. Not the worst, but no Star Trek or Planet of the Apes-like reboot.

DVD extras: The Blu-Ray has a few short behind-the-scenes featurettes and bits on production.

Mark Evans


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