herald

Wednesday 7 December 2016

Editorial: Next few days crucial for eurozone

An employee of a foreign exchange trading company stands in front of monitors displaying the current exchange rate of the Japanese yen against the Euro in Tokyo June 30, 2015
An employee of a foreign exchange trading company stands in front of monitors displaying the current exchange rate of the Japanese yen against the Euro in Tokyo June 30, 2015

ONCE again Greece is on the precipice.

There are queues at banks and a €60-a-day limit on cash withdrawals.

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is playing hardball at negotiations with the European Commission, IMF and European Central Bank.

It looks certain that Greece will today miss a massive debt repayment to the IMF as the country's European partners shut the door on extending a credit lifeline after Athens announced a referendum on the terms of the bailout.

The Greek people have been asked by EC president Jean-Claude Juncker to this Sunday vote Yes in favour of staying in the eurozone.

Tsipras's Syriza party is urging a No vote to prevent further austerity measures.

Others have urged a return to negotiations.

The next few days will be crucial for the stability of the euro and the future of the European project, in which Ireland is so heavily involved.

The continent's leaders must do everything possible to resolve this crisis.

Memories of Ballymun

Ballymun was often a hotbed of crime in the 80s and 90s.

The flats developed a reputation for drug-dealing and anti-social behaviour.

But behind the grim statistics there were people and families with wonderfully colourful lives.

Everything about the Ballymun towers was about community.

Neighbours looked out for each other, helped each other out and were fiercely protective of their extended family.

Children grew up side by side and built friendships that lasted a lifetime.

When they were built, the high-rise towers were futuristic and impresive, but over time they became imposing and grey. However, inside the flats they were colourful, warm and homely.

There may be some bad memories associated with the imposing towers, but many people remember the Ballymun towers with fondness.

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