herald

Thursday 28 August 2014

Well, fancy that -- Sinn Fein are now trying to convince young men to not use guns

Sinn Fein had a big launch of a policy document yesterday. The document called for a major investment and refocusing of our national effort to make Ireland better.

It detailed several aims, two of which really leapt out. It called for more sniffer dogs to find firearms and extra resources to deal with organised crime.

Yep. Sinn Fein are looking for help finding guns and controlling illegal organisations. (Make your own jokes at this point).

They even said they'd put resources into steering young people away from crime. That's right, they're going to set about convincing young men not to shoot people.

Luckily, this crackdown will have to take place in the context of the Gerry Adams's previously expressed position on crime: "We know that breaking the law is a crime, but we refuse to criminalise those who break the law in pursuit of legitimate political objectives.''

So, if a political candidate drags you out of your house and beats you about the head with a rubber hose while screaming "vote for me or leave here in an ambulance", then that's okay.

In the history of mankind, aren't the worst atrocities always committed in pursuit of what someone believes to be 'legitimate political objectives?' Isn't that the international justification for all senseless slaughter?

On reflection, this is unfair. Sinn Fein are committed to the democratic process.

Attacking them over the past is easy, cheap and cynical. They have as much right as any other party to release plans to curb illegal gun use.

To make it up to them I'm going to buy an 'IRA: Undefeated Army' T-shirt from their online store (they're currently on special offer).

q SO, Irish media is post-coital and exhausted after all the debate analysis.

Know how many people watched the debate? Nearly three quarters as many as watch The Apprentice.

The Irish electorate cares more about whether Bill Cullen will employ the pretty wan who tried out for Playboy or the pretty fella who struggles with English.

Still, it could be worse, look at it this way; nearly double the number who watched the debate stayed glued to the telly to find out if that nice woman from Tesco would beat Wagner on X Factor.

In fact, you could argue that more journalists analysed the debate than punters actually viewed it.

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