herald

Wednesday 18 October 2017

IRISH doctors have warned that the noise from Irish wind turbines are endangering people's health.

IRISH doctors have warned that the noise from Irish wind turbines are endangering people's health.

The Irish Doctor's Environmental Association (IDEA) believes that wind turbines here are four times nosier than they should be according to guidelines issued by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

WHO recommends a limit of 30 decibels for nightly noise to protect people's health.

The doctors have also asked that Minister for the Environment Alan Kelly imposes a set-back distance of 1,500m from houses for turbines.

A 500m exclusion zone is not enough according to the group as noise levels are likely to cause sleep disruption leading to problems in children and the elderly in particular.

"Children who are sleep-deprived are more likely to become obese, predisposing them to diabetes and heart disease in adulthood," Professor Alun Evans of the IDEA explained.

The University of Queens researcher pointed out that a range of other health concerns including stroke and heart attacks can also be related to sleep deprivation.

Criticism of wind energy regulation in Ireland comes as Bord Na Mona managing director Mike Quinn revealed that their plan is to build a new wind farm ever year for the next seven year

A spokesperson for Minister Kelly told the Herald that the department had received 7,500 submissions relating to draft revisions to the noise, setback distance and shadow flicker aspects of existing Wind Energy guidelines.

These revisions included a stringent sound limit of 40 decibels and the complete elimination of shadow flicker between wind turbines and neighbouring dwellings.

The department hopes to finalise these revisions in the near future they said.

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