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Tuesday 6 December 2016

'I'm happy being retired,' says broadcast legend Bill O'Herlihy (76) as he recalls the glory days of Italia '90

football

Former Republic of Ireland Kit-man Charlie O'Leary, front, with copy of Roddy Doyle's book 'The Barrytown Trilogy', with l-r; Eamon Dunphy, Roddy Doyle, Bill O'Herlihy and John Giles. 'Remembering Italia '90 - The Dublin: One City One Book Event. Aviva Stadium, Dublin. Picture: Caroline Quinn
Former Republic of Ireland Kit-man Charlie O'Leary, front, with copy of Roddy Doyle's book 'The Barrytown Trilogy', with l-r; Eamon Dunphy, Roddy Doyle, Bill O'Herlihy and John Giles. 'Remembering Italia '90 - The Dublin: One City One Book Event. Aviva Stadium, Dublin. Picture: Caroline Quinn

It's been almost a year since Bill O'Herlihy hung up his broadcasting boots, but he insists he is "as happy as Larry" in retirement.

However, while the legendary presenter (76) believes Darragh Maloney is a perfect replacement for him at the head of the panel, he often finds himself talking at the television while watching matches.

"I watch them from the outside now," he told the Herald. "It's a bit different, let me put it that way, but it's very good. Sometimes I'd say 'I'd like to ask this question or another question' but I'm lost in admiration for Darragh."

After almost five decades in broadcasting, Bill decided to retire last summer after the World Cup and said he's happy with the choice he made.

"It was my decision to retire and I felt I made the right decision - I was 49 years on television and I thought that was it. I'm as happy as Larry."

Bill joined author Roddy Doyle and reunited with soccer panelists Eamon Dunphy and John Giles and former Ireland star Paul McGrath yesterday for 'Remembering Italia '90' as part of the Dublin: One City One Book.

special

"I had a great relationship with John and Eamon for many many years and (Italia '90) was a very special time for the three of us," the former presenter said.

Recalling the famous summer in Irish football, former player and pundit Eamon said that "they were happy days".

"It was great to see so many happy people. People were enjoying football who never had really seen it before," he said.

"The football wasn't great but people didn't care about that. They were happy days."

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