herald

Saturday 3 December 2016

How you've grown: Ireland's only quintuplets go back to the ward where they were born 13 years ago at just one pound each

Amy, Conor, Cian, Rory, and Dearbhail Cassidy, holding pictures of when they were just born at the Rotunda Hospital, yesterday they meet some of the staff that cared for them, when they were born there thirteen years ago. The quins were delivered on 16th August 2001 at 25 weeks and 4 days. The quins weighed between 600 grams (1lb 6 oz)
Amy, Conor, Cian, Rory, and Dearbhail Cassidy, holding pictures of when they were just born at the Rotunda Hospital, yesterday they meet some of the staff that cared for them, when they were born there thirteen years ago. The quins were delivered on 16th August 2001 at 25 weeks and 4 days. The quins weighed between 600 grams (1lb 6 oz)
From right to left are, Dearbhail, Rory, Cian, Amy and Conor, Cassidy, from Wexford, with their parents Veronica and Kevin at the Rotunda Hospital where they meet some of the staff that cared for them, when they were born there thirteen years ago. The quins were delivered on 16th August 2001 at 25 weeks and 4 days. The quins weighed between 600 grams (1lb 6 oz)
The Cassidy Quintuplets from County Wexford celebrated their fifth birthday in the Rotunda hospital in 2006

The country’s only quintuplets have returned to the neo-natal unit where they were born more than 13 years ago.

Conor, Cian, Rory, Amy and Dearbhail Cassidy (13) captured the hearts of the nation when they arrived in Dublin’s Rotunda Hospital in 2001.

Yesterday, all were welcomed back by the happy midwives and doctors who helped with their high-risk delivery.

The quintuplets from Bridgetown, Co Wexford revealed that they didn’t know how to react despite the fact that their remarkable birth once saw them reach national fame and even feature as tiny guests on The Late Late Show.

“It was a bit awkward because we’re not used to the attention,” said Dearbhail.

The teenagers, who ranged in weight between 1lb 6oz to 1lb 11oz at their birth, revealed that the hardest thing about being a quintuplet is having to share everything with one another.

ii Quins Rotunda DE 05.jpg  

“Sharing everything is the hardest part about being a quin. Me and Amy have to share a room,” said Dearbhail.

“Having to share birthdays and stuff is hard. We have just one cake but we don’t fight to blow out the candles,” said Rory who aspires to be a journalist.

Mum Veronica said returning to the hospital with her teenagers was a fantastic feeling.

“It’s a good feeling actually. It’s great to see everyone who treated me so well and looked after us and my husband Kevin,” she said.

“Life’s not as stressful or hectic anymore. We’re not running around with bottles and nappies or bathing or feeding them.

“My first years with the babies are a distant memory.

“I don’t remember much about the first few years because everything was so non-stop,” she said.

The quintuplets are now happy and healthy teenagers whose interests range from current affairs, to horse-riding and even Kim Kardashian.

PL7296791The Cassidy Quint.jpg  

“Conor and Dearbhail are really into horse-riding. Rory and Cian are into handball. Amy is into camogie and basketball,” she said.

“Amy is a big fan of the Kardashians and Rory absolutely loves newspapers and wants to be a journalist at some stage.”

Christine McDermott, Advanced Nurse Practitioner at the Rotunda, spoke about the stressful night the quintuplets were born.

“I was actually on a night off at home and we were on call for the delivery.

“I had Amy. She was always very lively and I spent the first night trying to stop her pulling out her lines and her monitor leads and her mum said she’s still the same,” Christine joked.

When asked what advice they would give anyone else in a similar situation, the quintuplets said getting along was the recipe for success.

“Try to get on for the sake of your parents and their stress levels,” they joked.

hnews@herald.ie

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