herald

Wednesday 18 October 2017

Horror as searchers hunt for bodies amongst Ukraine's sunflower fields

Emergency workers, police officers and even off-duty coal miners - dressed in overalls and covered in soot - searched through wreckage and bodies scattered across sunflower fields and Ukrainian villages today after a Malaysian jetliner flying high above the country's battlefield was shot down, killing 298 people.

The crash site was sprawling, spread out over fields between two villages in eastern Ukraine - Rozsypne and Hrabove - and access to it remained difficult and dangerous. The road from Donetsk, the largest city in the region, to the crash site was marked by five rebel checkpoints Friday, with document checks at each.

Fighting apparently still continued nearby. In the distance, the thud of Grad missile launchers being fired could be heard this morning.

In the sunflower fields around Rozsypne, 40 kilometers from the Russian border, lines of men disappeared into the thick and tall growth. One fainted after finding a body. Another body was covered in a coat.

In Hrabove, several kilometers away, huge numbers of simple sticks, some made from tree branches, were affixed with red or white rags to mark spots where body parts were found.

Among the debris were watches and smashed mobile phones, charred boarding passes and passports. An "I Love Amsterdam" T-shirt and a guidebook to Bali suggested holiday plans.

  Large chunks of the Boeing 777 that bore the airline's red, white and blue markings lay strewn over one field.  The cockpit and one turbine lay a kilometer apart, and residents said the tail landed another 10 kilometers away, indicating the aircraft most likely broke up before hitting the ground.

EVIDENCE

One rebel militiamen in Rozsypne said he had seen a part of the fuselage, more evidence the plane was struck by a projectile.

The area has seen heavy fighting between government troops and pro-Russia separatists, and rebels had bragged about shooting down two Ukrainian military jets in the region just a day earlier.

Ukraine accused the rebels of shooting down the Malaysia Airways plane. The rebels denied it and accused government forces of the same; President Petro Poroshenko denied it as well.

Russian President Vladimir Putin blamed Ukraine for the downing, saying it was responsible for the unrest in its Russian-speaking eastern regions - but did not accuse Ukraine of shooting the plane down and not address the key question of whether Russia gave the rebels such a powerful missile. Ukraine and the West have accused Russia of supporting the rebels, a charge that Moscow denies.

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk described the downing Friday as "international crime" whose perpetrators would have to be punished in an international tribunal.

"Yesterday's terrible tragedy will change our lives. The Russians have done it now. This is an International crime for which perpetrators will have to be tried by the by the International Tribunal in The Hague," he was cited as saying by the Interfax-Ukraine news agency.

An assistant to the insurgency's military commander, Igor Girkin, said today on condition of anonymity that eight out of the plane's 12 recording devices had been located at the crash site. He did not elaborate. Since airplanes normally have both a flight data recorder and a cockpit voice recorder, it was not exactly clear what devices he was referring to.

He said Girkin was still considering whether to give international crash investigators access to the sprawling crash site. Any investigators would need specific permission from the rebel leadership before they could safely film or take photos at the crash site.

Kenneth Quinn, of the Flight Safety Foundation, said an international coalition of countries should lead the investigation. The Unites States has offered to help.

Malaysian Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lay repeatedly insisted today that the airline's path was an internationally approved route and denied accusations that Malaysia Airlines was trying to save fuel and money by taking a more direct flight path across Ukraine.

"I want to stress that this route is an approved path that is used by many airlines including 15 Asia Pacific airlines. We have not been informed that the path cannot be used," he said

Malaysia's prime minister said there was no distress call before the plane went down.

warningS

Aviation authorities in several countries, including the FAA in the United States, had issued warnings not to fly over parts of Ukraine prior to yesterday's crash. Within hours of the crash, several airlines announced they were avoiding parts of Ukrainian airspace.
 Today, Ukraine's state aviation service closed the airspace over two regions currently gripped by fighting - Donetsk and Luhansk - and Russian aviation regulators said Russian airlines have suspended all transit flights over Ukraine.

At a news conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Airlines updated its nationality count of passengers, saying the plane carried 173 Dutch, 24 Malaysian, 27 Australian, 12 Indonesian, 9 British, 4 German, 4 Belgian, 3 Filipino and one person each from Canada and New Zealand.

In Kuala Lumpur, several relatives of victims were meeting with counselors at the international airport. A distraught Akmar Mohamad Noor, (67) said her older sister was coming to visit the family for the first time in five years.

"She called me just before she boarded the plane and said, 'See you soon,'" Akmar said.

In the Netherlands, national flags were flying at half-staff across the country as residents mourned the tragic victims.
 US president Barack Obama called the crash a "terrible tragedy" and spoke by phone with Putin as well as Poroshenko. Britain asked for an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Ukraine.

hnews@herald.ie

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