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Friday 30 September 2016

Dublin shows strongest growth as 1.34 million now living in city

Seven of the ten fastest growing areas are in Dublin - with the remaining three lying on the commuter belt in easy reach of the capital.
Seven of the ten fastest growing areas are in Dublin - with the remaining three lying on the commuter belt in easy reach of the capital.

The population of Dublin has jumped to 1.34 million, suggesting that the recovery is most acute in the capital.

More than 72,000 people have moved into Dublin in the past five years, an increase of 5.7pc.

The overall population jump in the country was 3.7pc to 4.75 million, but there is a clear trend in Dublin and surrounding counties which are recording the biggest jump.

The preliminary count of the census, which was completed just five weeks out from census night in April, is done by electoral division, of which there are about 3,500 in the country.

Seven of the ten fastest growing areas are in Dublin - with the remaining three lying on the commuter belt in easy reach of the capital.

Blanchardstown-Abbotstown, The Ward in Fingal and Tallaght-Springfield recorded the biggest increases in population.

Population

Meanwhile, Blanchardstown-Blakestown, Glencullen in south Dublin and Lucan-Esker in west Dublin and rural Balbriggan also made the top ten.

There are areas in Dublin, however, where a sharp fall in population has been seen since the last census. An area in Ballymun, Pembroke West and Merchants Quay have all shown drops in the number of people living there.

Justin Gleeson, of the All Ireland Research Observatory in NUI Maynooth, said this may be down to a number of reasons, including people being priced out of the city centre or changing family circumstance and a higher number of family homes or a better quality of life being available in the suburbs and the commuter belt.

Dublin also recorded the greatest inward migration of 7,981 and overall population increase of 5.7pc.

Elsewhere in the country, the census data has shown an emerging divide between rural and urban recovery, with the biggest growths to be seen in the east of the country and commuter counties like Kildare, Meath and Louth.

Donegal, Sligo and Mayo have seen a population drop, among 40pc of electoral areas which have seen a decline, many of them in rural and peripheral areas.

The largest outward migration came from Donegal, which lost 6,731 people and experienced a population drop of 1.5pc, the largest in the country.

"It's a very mixed picture, we can see that parts of the country are reviving but equally there are other places where there is an ongoing pattern of steady decline.

"We have a two-tier recovery," Piaras Mac Einri, lecturer in Migration Studies in UCC said.

The data also showed that women outnumber men in Ireland by a ratio of 978 men to every 1,000 women.

In Dublin there are 31,022 more women than men living in the county.

The figures account for the preliminary data gathered by the Central Statistics Office.

It will be next March before we get a the full picture from Census 2016.

Breach

The raw data has also shown that Ireland will need to add at least one TD to Dail Eireann so as not to breach the Constitution.

In Ireland there may only be 30,000 people per TD but the average now stands at just over that.

Three Dublin constituencies top the list as the ones most over the limit: Dublin North-West, with 32,299 persons per TD; Dublin Central with 32,016, and Dublin Rathdown with 31,375.

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