herald

Saturday 3 December 2016

Cyclists and pedestrians are warned of trucks' blind spot

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Paschal Donohoe T.D. launch the Road Safety Authority's new campaign to highlight the issue of blind spots on trucks, particularly in relation to cyclists. The launch of the campaign coincides with National Bike Week. The Minister is joined by Ms Moyagh Murdock, Chief Executive Office
Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Paschal Donohoe T.D. launch the Road Safety Authority's new campaign to highlight the issue of blind spots on trucks, particularly in relation to cyclists. The launch of the campaign coincides with National Bike Week. The Minister is joined by Ms Moyagh Murdock, Chief Executive Office

FIFTY-four cyclists and pedestrians have been killed in collisions with trucks since 2007, with road users being warned of blind spots for drivers of long vehicles in a new campaign.

Two cyclists have already died on Irish roads this year, and the Road Safety Authority (RSA) is asking cyclists, pedestrians and truck drivers to be extra-cautious.

The RSA and the gardai launched the campaign to mark the start of Bike Week, which began yesterday.

Moyagh Murdock, the RSA's chief, said that the message is simple - if you cannot see the driver, the driver cannot see you.

"Cyclists need to be aware of the existence of the 'danger zone' on trucks and should never ride along the kerb side of a truck, especially if it's turning left," said Ms Murdock.

"Truck drivers too need to be aware of the fact that the mirrors on their cab will not always give them a total view of any cyclist that may be riding alongside or behind the vehicle," she added.

Transport Minister Paschal Donohoe said that while the number of fatalities has halved since the introduction of extra mirrors for the front of large trucks in 2010, it has not fixed the issue entirely.

Separately, the Dublin Cycling Campaign has launched a new campaign to encourage authorities to clamp down on vehicles illegally parked on bike lanes and has asked cyclists and passers-by to post photographs online of examples of the problem.

enforcement

"There's little or no enforcement, there's quite a lot of it and it happens every day. It's selfish parking.

"There should be clearways between 7am and 10am and 4pm-7pm, when there will be a high number of cyclists.

"Bike week is about encouraging people to cycle and feel safe cycling, and this is an important issue," said spokesman Keith Byrne.

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