herald

Monday 26 June 2017

Fairytale ending as Twink pays €18k debt to keep €1.2m home

Twink in her Knocklyon home Picture: Bryan Meade
Twink in her Knocklyon home Picture: Bryan Meade

Twink can keep her €1.2m home after she paid off €18,000 of mortgage arrears.

The veteran panto star had been forced to put the Georgian property in Knocklyon on the market before Christmas after a court battle with Start Mortgages.

However, the Circuit Civil Court yesterday heard that Twink, whose real name is Adele King, had cleared €18,000 in arrears, a move that returned control of Idrone House to her.

Barrister Shaula Connaughton-Deeny told Judge Jacqueline Linnane that repossession proceedings against King and her estranged husband, David Agnew, could be struck out.

Ms Connaughton-Deeny said King had paid off all mortgage repayment arrears and her client, Start Mortgages, no longer required her to sell her home or for the bank to obtain a possession order against it.

The court heard that Twink had paid off the debt, as joint defendant Agnew had not been engaging with the bank and had not been living in the property.

Judge Linnane had earlier heard that Agnew was aware of the proceedings but had to be served with the legal writ at his place of work, the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama, on Rathmines Road, Dublin.

When the bank issued proceedings against the couple it was owed about €250,000 overall, including the €18,000 arrears, the hearing was told.

Value

Twink's clearance of the arrears means she continues to own her home and will return to making monthly repayments of €209.80 on the remaining mortgage.

The last known market value of Idrone House - which has its own priest hole - was €1.2m.

Twink gave a newspaper interview about the "proposed sale" of her house, but when the proceedings were last mentioned before Judge Linnane last month, Ms Connaughton-Deeny said there had been confusion as to whether or not the property had actually been publicly advertised for sale.

She said that an online search on the day before the December hearing had not shown it to be on the market, other than what had been reported in the press.

Twink's solicitor, Mark Doyle, had told that hearing that according to a property agent there was a strong interest by potential buyers.

A property industry professional told the Herald yesterday that although the house never went on the open market, there had been potential buyers lined up who were "very interested" in it.

"It was ready to go and a list of potential viewers was lined up but it was never put on view. The house never went on the online property sites either," the source said.

Judge Linnane struck out possession proceedings against Twink and Agnew.

No mention was made in court with regard to legal costs attached to the drawn-out proceedings and numerous court hearings.

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