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Friday 9 December 2016

Chocolate ‘could lower heart attack risk’

Research led by the University of Aberdeen found that compared to people who ate no chocolate, those with a higher intake had an 11% lesser risk of cardiovascular disease and a 25% reduced risk of associated death
Research led by the University of Aberdeen found that compared to people who ate no chocolate, those with a higher intake had an 11% lesser risk of cardiovascular disease and a 25% reduced risk of associated death

Good news has never been so delicious.

A new study has linked eating up to 100g of chocolate a day with a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

Research has found that compared to people who ate no chocolate, those with a higher intake had an 11pc lesser risk of cardiovascular disease and a 25pc reduced risk of associated death.

It was also linked with a 9pc lower risk of hospital admission or death as a result of coronary heart disease, while it was similarly associated with a 23pc reduced risk of stroke, even after taking account of other factors.

The University of Aberdeen study – which is tracking the impact of diet on the long-term health of 25,000 men and women – concluded that there was no evidence for cutting out chocolate to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Around one in five (20pc) participants said they did not eat any chocolate but among those that did, daily consumption averaged 7g – with some eating up to 100g.

Those who ate the most also tended to be younger, have a lower weight, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure, and were less likely to have diabetes and more likely to carry out regular physical activity – all of which add up to a favourable cardiovascular disease risk profile.

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